Autumn On The EB

Autumn On The EB
Fly Fishing The Millers - With over 30 years of fly fishing this river I will claim more knowledge and fish caught than anyone. There are over 40 miles of river and I will take you to the best sections and if you want to sections that never see another angler. Don't be fooled by those who say the Millers is a Spring and Fall river. I'll show you how to have great Summer action. The "EB of the Westfield" - Wild and beautiful is the only way to describe this river. There's a lot of water here but I know where to go to catch trout. After a trip you will too!! Solitude and trout IS the EB. The Swift - 20 trout days are not uncommon on this river if you know what to do and use. I'll show the way and you catch the trout. RATES - Full Day (6 hours) = $150.00 for one, $225 for two (lunch included). Half Day (three hours) $90.00 for one, $155.00 for two. Beginners Class - 3 hours ffor $90.00, all use of rods lines, reels included.

Monday, January 23, 2012

The Low Time Of The Year



It's that time of year. No matter how many flies you tie, no matter how many shows that you take in, no matter how many books and magazines you read it's the dark time of year for the fly fisher. Unless you are lucky enough to fish the Swift and the Farmington on occasion it is a season of longing for better times. Don't get me wrong. Fly tying in the depths of Winter can be very rewarding, a deep thought, creative process. I'm in the middle of that now!! But I would rather be fly fishing and I will be as January moves into February, the month where we first see the seasonal signs of change.

February - It's right around the corner and it's like a new relationship as an old relationship fades away. There is promise of a new beginning, a Spring that makes us all young again. It will be soon.

Fly Tying - it's been consuming but my inventories of scuds and Moby Dick Wets are now getting up to good levels. The demand for these patterns were very much appreciated in 2011. Hot Spots, for some reason, became very "hot" during the Fall. I have plenty of them too.

The Fly Fishers Guide To The Millers River - someone told me recently that it is a "classic". Hmmm....maybe not that but a very good guide to a very good river is what it is.

The above photo was taken on the "lower" Millers. This is where very few fly fishers go, even the locals. I guide on this section (and others) and WE CATCH TROUT!!

Think Hendricksons!!!

Ken

25 comments:

Kozman said...

I'm blessed with the last minute opportunity to travel to Costa Rica this up coming weekend and I'm scrambling for some insightful information on what fishing is best on the fly in that country. I figured this forum would be as good as any to solicit for some insight if others have visited there in the recent past and would like to share their experience. I'm going to be in the northwest quadrant of the country on the pacific ocean. Word is that most deep sea captains don't like bringing along fly fishermen because of the logistics with removing their down riggers. Any thoughts...suggestions...tips...etc...

The best part of these trips is the sunny, warm, postcard perfect fish frenzy places in the tropics. The worst part is knowing that slippery banks, ice shelves and frozen eyelets is in my near future once I get back.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Kozman,

I was in Costa Rica in '04 on a non fishing vacation. I love that country. There are TROUT in the mountains and I saw some snook and tarpon water around Jaco but most of the action appeared to be bluewater.

Good Luck!!

Ken

Bob O said...

Jan 24th, 50 degrees and sunny. And I'm at work ... arghh! The Swift's water level appears to be falling. If the weekend weather holds above freezing I will leave the bench and make a mid day visit.

Scootermsp said...

Headed to Newport Beach, CA Saturday. Harbor fishing this time of year includes Halibut and Sand Bass. With temps in the mid 70s who could complain.

Nate F said...

I'm assuming by your most recent post Ken that Millers is frozen this time of year? I've only been to the Swift so I didn't know if Millers is a tailwater or not, didn't see any dams on the map but thought I'd double check..thanks!

Millers River Flyfisher said...

scoottermsp,

That sounds like fun. Wish I could get into a halibut contest with you. Good luck on the West Coast.

Nate F,

The Miller is not a tailwater. It's the Swift and the Deerfield that hold that distinction of being tailwaters in this State. Normally, the Millers is encased in ice by now but this Winter has been warmer and one of high flows which has kept the ice from forming. This is a rare occasion but it can change. January of 2006 saw open water with mild temperatures BUT February saw ice so thick that it shut down the flow gauges. The dams on this river are flood control and not the classic (bottom release) tailwater type.

If the river is not encased it ice and the flows are not dangerous then take a chance. I would go to the Kempfield section or Rezendes Pool because that is where the trout are if they survive the Winter. A thousand or so brown trout were stocked at Rezendes (Bears Den)Pool in October. For better or worse they should still be there.

Ken

Nate F said...

Ken - thanks for the info. I left my TU guide to trout streams of MA book at home. Not sure where those two pools are, mind helping me out? NathanJames.Foley@gmail.com if you care to share. if not, no worries.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Nate,

Nate, The Kempfield Pool is in Wendell Depot and Rezendes is in the Bears Den section of Athol. The TU guide is very lacking as far as the Millers is concerned. That's why I wrote the Millers fly Fishing Guide which you can get from this site.

Ken

Nate F said...

Thanks Ken, the check is in the mail for the guide and some flies. I'm heading out today, not sure if I'm going to stop at Miller or Swift yet. If it's any good, I'll let you know.

Nate

Hilary said...

Got a late start so to maximize time on the water I headed to Stony Brook in Weston. First time fishing there so you know how that goes...more exploring than fishing, but I had a good time. It's so nice out, it's tough to complain. No fish but found a good stretch of the river that would be worth going back to. Once I get that Millers River guide I'll be more equipped to head farther west. Cheers!

Nate

Nate F said...

Oops, my better half was signed into Google when I posted, that should've been a "Nate F said"..

Bob O said...

The Swift yesterday was one of those tntc days (too numerous to count). Very cooperative fishes interested primarily in a grey caddis nypmh with brown head on a #14 scud hook. Many smaller rainbows sprinkled with a few of larger proportion. Great way to shake the joneses. The warm weather's been a real boon to us soft water fishers regardless of the high flows. Spring is coming.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Bob O,

Been under the weather for the last two days so I have been chill'n at the vice with some MDW's, scud types and getting very real with the itsy-bitsy's. Even made up some dreaded WB's to dredge my early season homey waters - The Millers.

I have cabin fever!!!

kEN

Nate F said...

Bob O - was it crowded Sat??

Tony said...

Ken,

Whats your take on this winter? I know the flows are still screaming, but for instance, say we get little or even continue to see no snow flying, what is your feeling on how the Millers will turn out in March? Once the flows steady out a bit and maybe the river temps begin to climb.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Tony,

There's no way of knowing what the Spring will be like on the Millers. We have had a warm Winter but it has been a wet one with flows that have been above 400cfs for months. The water tables are high for sure. February could be a snowy month, ditto for March. The best that we can hope for is an AVERAGE late Winter moving into an AVERAGE Spring and then into an AVERAGE Summer. The last four years have not been AVERAGE with very high flows one year and then drought conditions (2010) for the next year.

Let's hope for the best.

Tony said...

Lately it's been like decoding the Enigma trying to figure out where to fish in this state...

Mike said...

Fished the pipe yesterday - must have been 15 cars parked at the Y Pool lot - overflow to the other side of the bridge. One spinning guy, and another FF at the pipe. High flows and the fish were hugging the bank on the opposite side, which made it hard to get a good drift, but it was a pretty good afternoon with 4 fish to the net and lost another 6-7 - one was easily over 18" and another (which I never did get a look at) took 2 runs from the pipe almost down to the log, before breaking off. Fish were caught on a red thread midge, although there was some topwater action right along the bank. Unfortunately a spin guy came along on the opposite bank and proceeded to kill 3 fish, which pretty much put them down fro the afternoon.

Falsecast said...

Nate F

I grew up fishing Stony Brook and know every rock. Curious as to how you found out about it? Is it in the TU guide?

BTW, glad to help point you right on that river if you'd like. I am more curious as to how you found it as not many people fish there and most of it is not accessible.

Brookie fest in the Spring

Anonymous said...

Falsecast,
I actually tried finding this river few years ago and had absolutely no luck. It would be great if you can give me directions here.

HJ

Falsecast said...

HJ,

Glad to help. In the town of Weston, park at the Kendall Green commuter rail parking lot. You can go upstream from where the river goes under Church Street and fish down (along the RR tracks), or walk straight through the woods and fish downstream. Some good spots are right next to the dump/transfer station, not too scenic.

I say this not to dissuade anyone, but the brook can't handle much pressure. It's a tiny brook and is very tough casting, if you even call it that. Lot's of Brook trout, and Ticks/Poison Ivy along with sink holes, be careful.

I caught my first trout on a fly there in the late 70's on a giant Mickey Finn using my Uncle's 6 weight :-) For me it's not even a day trip. I stop by after work, grab my 7 1/2foot and float some Adams or Caddis for 6/7 inch brookies. Nothing fancy needed. Years ago, they stocked rainbows and browns, now it is only brook trout that go in. Have fun, don't tell your friends :)

Millers River Flyfisher said...

To the Stoney Brook Guys,

There seems to be some love about this place and that's a very good thing. I have some secret brooks that I visit in the Millers Watershed from time to time. No hatchery trucks will be found there but the NATIVES (brookies) are there. I'll tell everyone anything about the Millers BUT these places I will never let anyone know about. Some places will always remain close to the vest, as they say. And that is also a very good thing.

Ken

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Let me share this with you:

It's Mid April and I find myself on one of these secret places along the Millers Watershed.. A # 18 serendipity is placed a foot below a tiny split shot. I could catch dozens of wild brookies but I'm really interested in the first four. As I make my way up one of these brooks I keep an eye out for fiddleheads which are popping out everywhere. I take a few of the fiddleheads and then dress out the four brookies, rising them in the cold Spring water that is at my feet. Out comes the small butane stove, a half stick of butter and some pepper and salt. The brookies go in first followed by the fiddleheads. Soon I have a streamside lunch that is a New England tradition that certainly was a New England tradition decades ago before we forgot that native trout tasted so good.

Did I ruin a native fishery? No!! There are more native brookies now than twentyfive years ago when I started this fishing/culinary adventure. I see nobody when I fish these brooks and may never see any one.

Do I appreciate these secluded adventures enough to fight for the environment that these fish survive in? Absolutely!

I release my Millers trout. My secret tribs along this watershed are secret unless you find them. If you do then enjoy them but protect them.

Ken

Browntrout said...

Hi Ken,

I believe the bug photo in your prior post is a dobsonfly (Family: Corydalisdae). It has aquatic larvae (helgamites), often used as fish bait. Actually, it has four wings, but the hind wings are shorter than forewings. This is a female. Males have very long curved mandibles (mouthparts).

BT

Nate F said...

Falsecast,

TU guide and a TU member mentioned it, I live pretty close. I had a tough time finding good access and room to cast, and when I finally did, I was so exhausted, it was a disaster. I did more exploring and found a decent little stretch up from Hastings, I thought Kendall Green was too tough to access...briars and overhanging trees everywhere, it was rough. I tried walking along the tracks and couldn't even find a spot to sneak down to the water. Shoot me an e-mail if you have any tips. Nathnjamess@gmail.com