Autumn On The EB

Autumn On The EB
Fly Fishing The Millers - With over 30 years of fly fishing this river I will claim more knowledge and fish caught than anyone. There are over 40 miles of river and I will take you to the best sections and if you want to sections that never see another angler. Don't be fooled by those who say the Millers is a Spring and Fall river. I'll show you how to have great Summer action. The "EB of the Westfield" - Wild and beautiful is the only way to describe this river. There's a lot of water here but I know where to go to catch trout. After a trip you will too!! Solitude and trout IS the EB. The Swift - 20 trout days are not uncommon on this river if you know what to do and use. I'll show the way and you catch the trout. RATES - Full Day (6 hours) = $150.00 for one, $225 for two (lunch included). Half Day (three hours) $90.00 for one, $155.00 for two. Beginners Class - 3 hours ffor $90.00, all use of rods lines, reels included.

Friday, March 6, 2015

This End Of Winter And What To Expect


First off, the 200cfs flow on the Swift is real or very close to real. That's high water on this river and it's not coming from the spillway because I drove up to the spillway and nothing is happening there. It's from the bubbler and that is it. Are they drawing down Quabbin before a Spring melt? Maybe. Anyway, I have found 200 cfs to be the top end of interesting and challenging angling on this river at any season. I like LOW flows. At 200 cfs the Swift becomes more of a freestone river and I have my choice of those except during the heat of Summer when 200 cfs of cool flow is welcome. How long will this last?? I don't know.

What does this multi foot snow and ice pack mean to us? First it will probably mean a later start. A "later start" applies to the freestones like the EB and Millers but not the Swift (hopefully). The Swift will not be at flood stage and cloudy (hopefully) but the others will.

What to do? Fish the smaller streams and tributaries of larger rivers because they will recede sooner and be fishable AND it's about time fly fishers experience this resource. Over the years we have seemed to ignore these waters because they are supposed to be too easy to fish (not true) or the fish don't care much about hatch matching, fine tippets, our 40 ft casts, or our state of the art equipment. (mostly nottrue). Sure some are stocked, like larger rivers, but there are many streams and brooks that hold ONLY native trout. You have to sneak up on these water angels (Chinese term for native mountain trout) to catch them and the thrill is equal to that size 18 BWO disappearing in that late Autumn swirl.

Years ago I used to see fly fishers on these waters. Sadly that's no longer true. We want "storied" waters, big fish from big waters. We are missing the soul of this sport in our effort to cover as much water as possible "whacking and stacking" (not my term, their term) as we go along. I haven't abandoned these secret waters and still ply them and feel very good about it.

The brookie above comes from an unstocked tributary of the Millers where I have been playing with those guys for over 30 years.

Think about it!!

Ken

15 comments:

Hibernation said...

Ken,

It's funny, to me, the Millers, the Swift and similar rivers are where I go when I cant float a fly through those little blue lines on the topo maps - many of which start with dots and dashes.

I totally agree with you - they are, absolutely, amazing resources which we can spend some time, soak in the environment and catch some of the most beautiful fish to grace the earth.

Will

Brk Trt said...

You don't have to convince me Ken.
Love those little waters.

Anonymous said...

Ken,

Sounds like the state already has concerns about the amount of snow pack on Quabbin and trying to stay ahead of a major melt spring runoff.

Its great to see you recommending that readers go out this year and explore new waterways. The stories of the Swift, Millers and EB have been talked about for years and by now everyone knows these waterways. I agree, too many fisher-folk only fish where they read about others fishing and catching whereas one big "lure" of fly fishing comes in the adventure of seeking out and finding new productive waters where few if any ever go.

I hope you continue to promote and supplement in new stories of your fishing adventures on "unnamed" brooks, tributaries and waterways in 2015 and believe offering them to readers will open many eyes to the world of "finding one's own secret gem" out there somewhere.

Well done and keep it up!

Jo Tango said...

I love this challenge and will seek out these waters. Any good online maps that show "blue lines"? Guess I'll be dusting off the 7' rod soon and leave the 11' at home.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

A Word To The Wise- It would not be a good idea to mention names and locations of streams or the tools used to find them. I've been writing away for years about the Millers, EB and Swift because they are larger rivers and are popular anyway. Smaller streams can't take the pressure.

Ken

Troy Holt said...

You're right, it's not that hard to find these place if you put in the time. I spent pretty much every day of a summer a few years back exploring all the state forests and local woods near me. I found brook trout in places that nobody would have imagined! They are actually pretty abundant, from that tiny creek in the woods behind your local elementary school to the drainage ditch flowing behind the Department of Public Works!

I am worried about runoff this year. I fear a lot of the tiny streams I fish will be completely blown out. The paths alongside them are going to overflow and water flood into the messes of bushes and trees. I hope for the best, but this snow is definitely going to have an effect.

Anonymous said...

Ken,

A quick question for you; Does the Swift typically get a stocking of trout in the first week or two of July? Like when the C&R rules come into effect?

If so, are fish typically put in both above Rt. 9 and below?

Thanks,
Tom from Saugus

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Troy,

You get it!!! Good comment!!!

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Brk Trt,

Convince you???

You and I and many others are members of the same choir!!

Ken

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Tom from Saugus,

First, I think that you may be thinking of below Route 9. Above Route 9 it's c&r all year.

Both sections will be stocked this Spring. The lower section (route 9 to Cady Lane and just below) will be stocked around July 1st in addition to a Spring stocking as it has been over the years.

Ken

Anonymous said...

hi ken, has the swift been fishing well recently? I havnt been out in a while and was hoping to get out this week

Anonymous said...

Ken,

Do you think all this snow and runoff has a shot at bringing some salmon/lakers into the Swift? There is a discussion about this going on on another forum... Interested to hear your thoughts.

Troy Holt

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Anonymous # 1
"Has the Swift been fishing well lately"? NO!!!! Read this blog!!!

Anonymous # 2

Fat chance on lakers and/salmon. High water over the spillway doesn't mean salmon/lakers in the Swift. Nothing is coming over the spillway.

Ken

Josh said...

I haven't heard of anyone catching fish in the swift recently, i'm pretty much to the point of waiting until its stocked. I was planning on checking a "less fished" spot I know of for those brookies, they might still be around. Haven't seen a bow or brown there the last two times I went.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Josh,

Fish for the brookies. They stock the Swift and in the first week anyone can catch fish. That's not the kind of trout fishing that we like. Wait a few weeks and fish for trout that have wised up.

Ken