Autumn On The EB

Autumn On The EB
Fly Fishing The Millers - With over 30 years of fly fishing this river I will claim more knowledge and fish caught than anyone. There are over 40 miles of river and I will take you to the best sections and if you want to sections that never see another angler. Don't be fooled by those who say the Millers is a Spring and Fall river. I'll show you how to have great Summer action. The "EB of the Westfield" - Wild and beautiful is the only way to describe this river. There's a lot of water here but I know where to go to catch trout. After a trip you will too!! Solitude and trout IS the EB. The Swift - 20 trout days are not uncommon on this river if you know what to do and use. I'll show the way and you catch the trout. RATES - Full Day (6 hours) = $150.00 for one, $225 for two (lunch included). Half Day (three hours) $90.00 for one, $155.00 for two. Beginners Class - 3 hours ffor $90.00, all use of rods lines, reels included.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Dry Fly Magic!


This is the style of fly fishing that is set apart from all the other methods. It is the style that has captivated a breed of fly fishers for well over a hundred years. It is the true test, the hold grail and your one way ticket to angling heaven when all goes right. Halford, from England, developed it, Theodore Gordon brought it to this country and developed the flies for our streams, George LaBranche expanded it's usage to include Atlantic Salmon and then a host of others, Cross, Dette, Darbee, Jenkins, Flick, Fox , Marinaro to name a few, expanded the legacy. It is top shelf fly fishing. If many of the above names are unfamiliar to you then start reading. You'll be better at this endeavor. If you think that it isn't necessary, that high sticking your way through life just seems fine, then take up golf. But then you'll have to know who Bobby Jones was!!

Some readily admit that they don't GET this method. They are not successful. My advice is to start reading and bury yourself in Utube videos. Get an idea of what the trout are feeding on. (cahills and sulphurs are on our streams now. If you don't see any on the water fish them anyway). Learn the upstream approach to a rising trout. Learn that drag occurs BEFORE your FLY begins to drag. Your floating leader will drag first and that is true for nylon AND fluoro. Learn that your cast will spook more trout than your fly or equipment.

Dry Flies - I don't believe in strict "matching the hatch" but take a more impressionistic view of fly patterns in the 12 to 20 size range. My experience says that comparaduns in the right size and shade will cover 90% of the situations that we meet. Faulty presentation will result in failure. The Comparadun does a great job of imitating the adult mayfly and the pre adult trying to break through the surface.

Many years ago I used to spend the summers fishing the Squannacook with only dries, taking a half mile of river in the evening and fishing upstream for rising trout and casting to places that should hold trout. That strategy was carried to the Millers and then to the EB. This strategy has worked and still does. Finding a trout that has taken up position and is rising in a regular pattern and then making the perfect cast and then seeing that fly disappear in the "ring of the rise" is almost beyond words. You have to do it.

Go do it!!!

Ken

12 comments:

nhflyfisher said...

Very well said and I could not agree more. The only added thrill is when the fly that disappears inside the ring is one you have tied yourself.

Brk Trt said...

This is a great post.
I believe that there's no better sight than a trout rising to a dry fly.

Anonymous said...

Ken,

"Disappear in the ring of the rise", well said!

I might add that parachutes are fantastic dry fly performers as well as comparaduns. I've caught more, big trout, on a #16 parachute pheasant tail than any other dry i hold in my box.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Brk Trt,

Good to hear from you!

Anonymous,

"Ring of the Rise" is credited to the great Vince Marinaro. His book "The Modern Dry Fly Code" changed my life!!!

Ken

Anonymous said...

I want to try fishing the Swift from a boat... I know you are not a big fan of this, and I am not really a big fan myself. I hate kayakers and rafters going through the spot I'm fishing. But, I want to explore the lower Swift, look around at some of the sections I don't fish. Mainly I just want to cover water and see the rest of the Swift.

So my question to you, how far down should I put in my raft so I don't disturb fellow fly anglers? I was thinking I could also put it in where it meets the Ware and just paddle up until I start seeing people. To clarify as well, if I see an angler wading I'll pull it out and carry it past them, to avoid spooking fish.

Tom from Saugus

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Tom,

I'm a fan of boat fishing but not in the special regulation sections of the Swift.

Go downstream to the boat launch about 2 miles down River Rd. from RT 9.

I've heard that downstream is very good.

Ken

nhflyfisher said...

I fished Cady Lane last Thursday. About half a dozen kayakers came by going upstream and then returned. I was fishing for brook trout and they settled right back in within minutes after a boat came by. I admire your respect for your fellow angler. But if I see you, I will insist you stay in the water and drift by!

Bob O said...

Tom from Saugus ... I have often launched a canoe or kayak from the Cold Spring Road landing to which Ken refers. The water both above and below the launch is pristine. The same cold, clear flow we find at Route 9. As aquatic growth is significant, the water lends itself well to dry fly exploration. These are the days for terrestrials, hoppers and beetles, as well as conventional dries, and they are very effective on this water. The stream is chock full of trout of all type and dimension. Hang on, there are some lunkers. You will find great enjoyment exploring this area of the Swift. You can float all the way downstream to the the barrels at the upper Bondsville dam and upstream is an easy paddle to the tangles just below Cady Lane. Early morning, or late afternoon/evening probably are best bets as boat traffic is at a minimum. Tightlines.

Ken ... Keep up the great posts. Excellent content, as usual.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Tom from Saugus,

Listen to what Bob O says. He's a veteran and not a newbie posing as an authority. I respect he's opinion.

Ken

Anonymous said...

Much appreciated Bob! Thanks for the help!

Tom from Saugus

Paul N. said...

Ken,
My daughter lives up near the Squannacook river. Is there a specific area I should go to when I visit for a weekend? I know where it is but the last time I was there it looked kid of slow and muddy... not too inviting. Any help is appreciated.

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Paul,

My daughter just bought a house near this river, the same river where I learned to fly fish.

Find Townsend Harbor about 3/4 of a mile west of the high school just below a pond behind a dam. Fish downstream in the late afternoon and then fish upstream in the evening for rising trout. I did that 40 years ago and had a ball. Went back 10 years ago and had the same results. Couldn't of changed that much. It's an evening stream during the Summer.

Ken