Autumn On The EB

Autumn On The EB
Fly Fishing The Millers - With over 30 years of fly fishing this river I will claim more knowledge and fish caught than anyone. There are over 40 miles of river and I will take you to the best sections and if you want to sections that never see another angler. Don't be fooled by those who say the Millers is a Spring and Fall river. I'll show you how to have great Summer action. The "EB of the Westfield" - Wild and beautiful is the only way to describe this river. There's a lot of water here but I know where to go to catch trout. After a trip you will too!! Solitude and trout IS the EB. The Swift - 20 trout days are not uncommon on this river if you know what to do and use. I'll show the way and you catch the trout. RATES - Full Day (6 hours) = $150.00 for one, $225 for two (lunch included). Half Day (three hours) $90.00 for one, $155.00 for two. Beginners Class - 3 hours ffor $90.00, all use of rods lines, reels included.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Hot Fly, A Revelation And Thinking About The Ware

"Fly fishing is solitary, contemplative, misanthropic, scientific in some hands, poetic in others and laced with conflicting aesthetic considerations. It'd not even clear if catching fish is actually the point" John Gierach



Try this fly!!!

Hook - size 20 to 24 Saber scud hook or smaller midge hook
body - Dark Olive 140 denier thread
Rib - ultra thin copper wire
Wing Buds - Crystal flash
Head - black thread

You can tie dozens of these in no time at all due to it's very simple construction and it works because it is so generic. It represents all of those little guys we find in the Swift and can be fished solo or behind something like a WD40. It has worked on the Swift this past month.

The Ware River

By February I'm usually lost in a day dreaming swoon as the urge to fish my freestones in the Spring just takes over. This year I'm dreaming of the Ware River and reliving some of the awesome Spring days of last year. I fished some of the best dry fly water in central Massachusetts on that river. I would work a soft hackle just below the surface on a classic swing and then end up casting upstream with a floating offering as the RISE took over. I caught trout at every location on this river AND I usually had the place to myself. If fly fishing is a social experience for you then you may not feel comfortable on the Ware. That's what the Farmie and the Swift are for!!!

A Revelation -

Sometimes things all come together and seem to make sense at the strangest moments. I've always wondered why "nymphing" has captured the minds of so many fly fishermen while, at least for me, it seemed somewhat familiar and in a way old fashioned.

Then I did a Swift/Millers presentation to a TU group in Poughkeepsie NY last month and it finally came to me and almost derailed my presentation. I kept talking about our rivers but the thought was in my head for the rest of the show AND the ride home. The thought was that I've been "nymphing" since I was 9 years old and I did it with worms as any self respecting 9 year old SHOULD do. I learned the high stick, tight line methods of fishing a worm from pre internet magazines and from watching others who were catching fish. Toss the spinning line (same as a 20 ft leader) out there into the riffles at the head of a pool, keep slack to a minimum and watch for the hesitation in the drift.

I'm beginning to think that there are a lot of river fly fishers who have very few hours (maybe minutes) on a river WITHOUT a fly rod in their hands and that's a shame. It seems that today's revolutionary techniques are really old school techniques that now have a new label.

The more things change the more they stay the same.

The Swift - Lots of snow this weekend but the fish are still there. Go get them!!

Ken




12 comments:

Parachute Adams said...

Ken, I drove over the Ware River tonight where it goes under Route 181 on my way to Bondsville. It is flowing very nicely at this point in time I am happy to report.

Sam

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Sam,

A beautiful river that is totally under fished. It reminds me of fishing the Millers 20+ years ago.

Ken

Anonymous said...

Why do I tight line nymph? For many years I just fished when there were hatches. I never nymphed! Got tired of those non-hatch periods and needed something to try for those times. Took a short instructional class, caught a load of trout, and was hooked. I still prefer fishing to rises, and try to just fish those periods, but I now have another arrow in the quiver when I need it. You are right that nymphing is basically bait fishing with flies, but I have learned to roll with the flow, and play the hand that's dealt. Its all good!

Hibernation said...

Ken,

Wow, I never really considered that, but man... you are so right. Those classic spin gear tactics with lures or bait really are similar to various nymphing strategies. Good thought! In the end, fishing is fishing :)

Looking at that little fly, I'm going to tie some up for a soon (I hope) trip to the swift. I had a thought looking at it, instead of using new thread at the head, just tie off the olive and use black nail polish for head cement. It may save a step and would be durable as heck. What do you think?

Will

fischmeister57 said...

Ken,

I like your description of how nymphing reminds you of your boyhood fishing with a worm.

I have a similar analogy to make: I know that a lot of fly fishermen disdain strike-indicators, saying that you just need to develop your skill of watching the end of the line, being sensitive to every movement etc. etc. But what they don't understand is that when my strike-indicator goes down it takes me right back to when I was a boy and saw my bobber disappear under the surface. That was and is a thrill I won't let the purists take away from me.

I really like those little midges of yours!

Herm

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Anonymous,

I agree. One cannot be a one trick pony when you're faced with the challenges of trout streams. I nymph and swing flies as the conditions dictate.

Herm,

Seeing that leader STOP does the same for me.

Will,

I'm going to tie some to your recipe as this afternoon. Good idea!!!!

Ken

Parachute Adams said...

Ken, I have cabin fever big time, and hope it is not inappropriate to ask, but would you share a story of a big one that got away, or perhaps a special one that you netted? This time of year I think about some beauties that got away, including one wide brown trout that rolled over my dry fly as I drifted it alongside a brush pile. I still can't believe that one didn't connect.

Best Regards, Sam

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Sam,
Cabin fever?? You and me both!

I'll devote the next blog post to your idea of memorable trout!!

Ken

Hibernation said...

Wow Ken, I tried the black nail polish for the heads on those midges. Honestly, I dont think it will catch more or fewer trout, but, it was simple and easy to do. I just stick the hook point in a dunkin's cup to remove the fly from the vice so the polish dry's nicely. If you were doing a bunch, you could do a ton real fast finishing with the olive, and then just touch each one up individually with the black polish. Looking forward to wetting them in the Swift soon!

Millers River Flyfisher said...

Will,

I'm on it. Very good idea!!!!

Ken

Anonymous said...

Hi ken
Could you please send me your guide to the Millers River? I love the blog and learn a lot from it. Thank you.
My email is tommuir2152@gmail.com

Len said...

Hi Ken,

I just wanted to say thanks for this post from a few months ago. Yesterday I was on the Swift and did very well fishing these olive nymphs. I couldn't connect on red midges, so I changed to these and it was game on. Both brookies and the stockies loved them. Thanks again.

Len